4.07.2012

vintage scans: The Golden Home and High School Encyclopedia volume IV

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Thought I'd give everyone a break from the outfit posts and share a few of my favorite images from an old library book I found at the thrift store a while ago. I don't know about you, but if I see a cheap old book with beautiful color illustrations, it's really difficult for me not to buy it up. This book in particular is from a now defunct elementary school by my house, it even has the old library check out card in the front. Judging from the dates inside this book, I'd say that this encyclopedia is from the early '60s. Just goes to show, all of the coolest color illustrations comes from the 50s-60s. At least, I'd like to think so!

PS: Check out some more of my vintage scans over HERE 

PPS: Happy Easter/ Passover/ Spring Time to all of yous out there :) 


8 comments:

  1. love the cactus scan and the last camera scan..!

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  2. These are beautiful and make me so nostalgic for a time when encyclopedias were in style. I used to spend hours pouring over my grandmother's set when I was a kid...sigh.

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  3. I have Volume 1 through 6 and Volumes 9, 11, 13. I guess the rest got lost in moving.
    Want to sell them if there's a market. Any info on where to sell them?

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  4. These are all so great!

    http://polaroidsandpuds.blogspot.co.uk/

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  6. These are lovely old books. I own the complete set of twenty volumes. Golden Press did a number of wonderful children's reference sets in the early 1960s, including the sixteen volume Golden Book Encyclopedia (aimed at slightly younger children than the Home and High School one), the Golden Book Illustrated Dictionary (six volumes), the Golden Book Picture Atlas (six volumes), The Golden Treasury of Knowledge (sixteen volumes) and the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science (sixteen volumes). In addition to the sets, they also did quite a number of individual volumes on science, nature, history and the arts. All are beautifully written and illustrated. They are fascinating to browse through, and much of the information is still useful today. Most are freely available second hand, and are still popular with homeschoolers. I collect them, and own every one of the sets I mentioned above.

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